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View Profile Troisnyx
Pronounced "trwa-nix." I dream up meepy dreams full of meep.
Currently doing things nonprofit. (she/her)

Annette Singh @Troisnyx

29, Female

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Lancashire, UK

Joined on 6/26/11

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Comments (7)

Nice

I hear you love. Sometimes I wonder what it must feel like to be Katy Perry and not give a damn. To have my one hit, be rich off it, and laugh at all the crits.

That's not a place my mind is willing to go. ?

But I hope that if something like that should ever happen to me, that I don't let hubris take over.

But think of the power trip that must come from being able to look critics in the face and say "I retired in 2008 because I kissed a girl and I liked it."

Perhaps, and that could very easily lead to hubris. Something equally or more powerful, I would be blown away by it perhaps — but I cannot, I must not forget when I had no power at all.

I really like your philosophy on music. In the end, music is art, and art is emotion. Can't wait to listen to your track number 200, even if i just knew about you yesterday. I also really like what you said about my guitar playing on my AIM submission :)

Thanks for the kind words, on the review and everything else. <3

The structure of the track is almost done now, which I'm grateful for. I'll be continuing this in earnest in the days that follow.

I CANT WAIT TO SEE MORE OF YOUR BEAUTIFUL MASTERPIECES AAAH THERE SO GOOD.

You know, I'm half here and half there when it comes to how competitions go. I've seen some judges that seem to actively score lower on just those genres that leave a bad taste in their mouth, opposed to judging a piece by its own merit within a given genre or smatterings of genre. I feel half of a track's art is in that industry level conformity -- or I should really say accessibility and intelligibility to the average person, and the rest is up to the adventurousness of the composer. In the end, it's about the clarity of communication to the end user. If I have to explain the value of my piece to another person with all sorts of flowery description boxes, that's not them enjoying it for their own sake, you know?

Trouble I find is that the pieces that I considered a little left field weren't all *that* left field (for left field, a good few NGADM Round 1 entries should do the trick). They're as left field as the highly celebrated Field Music -- highly celebrated in the UK at least -- and it's not like the general public can't vibe with this sort of thing.

I remember there being a long protracted discussion about what makes the "Industry Standard (TM)" and I've asked person after person about this, and no one seems to really agree.

@Troisnyx You're absolutely right. I think regarding the competitions here, we're butting up against this thing of comparatively few people being anything past hobbyists in their working genres, as opposed to classically trained, business degree or music ed majors, what have you. There's not a lot of super professional exposure to the business, or what is actually marketable. And then music itself is very subjective.

Myself, I try to judge based on the best examples I've had for presentation and sound stage, musicality, and craft, as genre appropriate. Obviously no one is going to judge the guy playing a piano piece for not having built his own piano and tuned each of the strings by hand, but there are some people out there who are convinced that just because you used a snare sample or ripped a piano loop (called flipping a sample in hip-hop) that automatically your entire craft is inauthentic, and you are trash, so you deserve a bad score. Imo, I'm of the opinion that it's not about reinventing the wheel. It's about using what you have in a way that speaks to people, in a way that works and inspires you to keep creating. Different approaches are valid for different styles.

I think I would be happier if more judges would do like you and me, sit back, and explain why they made the scoring decisions they did. I get tons of thank you letters whenever I do a competition -- there's tons of demand for it, and I don't see why anyone wouldn't even just take the time and write at least a paragraph, if not to critique, then at least to thank them for coming out!